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Should you accept a lower-level job when returning to workforce after an extended break?

Should you accept a lower-level job when returning to workforce after an extended break?

Author: Moe Harrison /Tuesday, October 15, 2019/Categories: SNI Companies, SNI Financial, For Job Seekers, SNI Certes, For Job Seekers, SNI Technology, Accounting Now, Staffing Now

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Coming back to the workforce after an extended break isn’t without its challenges. In fact, we wrote a blog with our tips to make the process a little less daunting. Some of our top suggestions included updating your LinkedIn profile, brushing up on your professional skills, joining networking groups/leadership conferences, and working with a staffing agency such at SNI Companies. For the purpose of today’s blog though we are going to look at another common dilemma: when re-entering the workforce should you accept a lower level position?

The question of whether or not it’s ok to take a position that is below where you were when you left is a common one. Your own concerns about a diminished or outdated skill set, a gap in your mastery of technology over time or changes in the market that you may or may not be aware of can easily give you the sense that you are operating from a position of weakness. Similarly, hiring managers may have concerns that the same person who is considering a pay cut may be overqualified for the role and would leave once they got a foot in the door.

We recommend viewing your starting position as a way of re-entering the workforce. You’ll want to make sure the career and salary make sense and are fair, but also don’t get hung up on the job title or whether or not the money is in line with where you were previously. Instead ask yourself: What is the next career move? Are there growth opportunities at the company you are interviewing at? Have they hired others previously who were re-entering the workforce and how has that gone? Readjusting to the corporate world can also pose its own challenges, especially if you have a family, and are now juggling priorities at home while trying to re-engage professionally. Considering taking a less stressful positon than you had before leaving the workforce, even if it pays less, may be a good way to adjust to your new schedule and commitments on both fronts.

In conclusion, taking a lesser position in the short term may seem like a step back but in the long run can help you reach your career goals and maintain a healthy balance. Depending on the length of your break, you may need to take a slightly less demanding role and brush up on your skills before you advance your career and get overly focused on compensation. Don’t let this discourage or deter you, it’s merely a step in the right direction.

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Moe Harrison
Moe Harrison

Moe Harrison

Moe Harrison is a Regional Vice President with SNI. With more than 15 years’ experience in recruiting and personnel management, Moe has a unique perspective on the top issues and concerns of employers and candidates in the accounting and finance fields.

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Full biography

Moe Harrison is a Regional Vice President with SNI. With more than 15 years’ experience in recruiting and personnel management, Moe has a unique perspective on the top issues and concerns of employers and candidates in the accounting and finance fields.

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